Building a new PC

Discussion in 'Technical Discussion & Support' started by Skaara Dreadlocks, Mar 8, 2016.

  1. Skaara Dreadlocks

    Skaara Dreadlocks
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    Tha Baws

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    Heya'all. A little bit of personal info:
    I've been considering for a while now to build mah'self a new Gaming PC, with the VR goggles and all coming up, especially Star Citizen at the end of this year. I received some extra bonus-money this month (a little less than expected, but still just about enough), and will probably get some more extra in June. Come summer, I will use my monthly wager on vacation and whatnot, and after summer I'll be moving out, to get my own place (which will be expensive, but I've saved up and am still saving up a small ammount every month). Therefor, I desperately want to finish this PC project, preferrably including VR goggles, in early June.

    Cutting to the chase:
    The physical PC-building is not a problem, but I'm no expert so I know pretty much nothing about which parts are best for their price, and which fits with which etc. So I've looked up PC-gamer's mid-range PC build guide, because a budget PC-build will not suffice, and a high-end PC build is just too expensive as well as unnecessary.

    All I'm wondering is, are these parts okay? Does anyone have any bad/good experiences with any of these parts, or does anyone have any recommendations for any other parts? I'll also need a monitor, and have no clue which one to get.

    I'd appreciate any feedback, if anyone feels capable and willing :)
     
  2. Bamul

    Bamul
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    It's funny how they call this a mid-range gaming PC. With a GTX 970, 8 gigs of RAM and that processor, I'd call it high end if you want to game at 1080p with most settings maxed in practically all games (though I guess high end nowadays means 4K resolution and that). However, I don't know how well it would handle VR. According to this, it would be more than fine.

    There's also the question of your specs right now. If you could list what's in your current PC (for this specifically I only need to know the GPU, CPU and RAM), then I could tell you if it's worth upgrading to a rig like the one in the article in regards to increase in frames per second vs. money spent.

    Remember that the prices of components vary with each country.
     
    #2 Bamul, Mar 8, 2016
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 8, 2016
  3. NuclearWastE3

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    Yo, Skaara. There's an article in a PC Gamer mazine that's sitting directly in front of me that says:

    So, from the article you provided a link to, you check off as "good to go" on everything :) You're spot on with the RAM, Cheeki Breeki with the graphics card, and are several points above the recommendation for the Intel processor. Also, that specific Crucial Ballistix Sport RAM is positively talked about in PC Gamer. It's been appearing in almost every issue for two years.

    I don't know much about motherboards; but, basically, they're all quite good nowadays. Power supply (good), CPU cooler (awesome) disk drive (check), computer case (check).

    The last things on the list are the hard drives. Your primary gaming drive will be the Samsung SSD 250GB (which they talk highly about in the magazine as well). It is suppose to be lighting fast compared to typical hard drives. You can also upgrade to a 500GB version for half the cost more than the original. Then you got your other hard drive (which happens to be the typical kind :p) No worries, though, it's still fast and has a shit-ton-of memory space.

    Lastly; your monitor. The one I'm using is the Dell U2414H. I don't know anything about modern gaming monitors though :noidea: This one supports 1080p resolution and the colors are nice. My only complaint about this monitor is that on/off button. If you happen to press the on/off button, it is basically impossible to turn the monitor back on without it saying "going to power save mode." There are no known fixes for this. It just one of its annoying, hardwired gimmicks. Once this happens, you'd basically need to restart your entire computer to get the monitor to turn back on correctly.

    If I find anything else that pertains to this, I'll be sure to inform you about it ;) Other than that, it looks like you're all set.

    ------------------
    Side note: I'll post in the rest of the forum tomorrow. I only had enough time for just this one.
     
    #3 NuclearWastE3, Mar 9, 2016
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 9, 2016
  4. Bamul

    Bamul
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    Nice detailed post Nuclear, makes me feel like a dick for not spending the same amount of time on mine and just assuming that it will be enough for people with less know-how about this. :lol: I agree with pretty much everything you said, just wanted to add a few comments:

    Yeah, the RAM is DDR4 (to Skaara: it's standard for the VRAM on today's gaming graphics cards, but most people still use DDR3 RAM outside of that), so it's actually faster than what most folks have in their rigs. Though when it comes to choosing what's better for gaming - one stick of DDR4 RAM or two sticks of DDR3 RAM - I'm not quite sure. In any case, most games still don't need more than 8 gigs of RAM, but we are slowly seeing more and more games adding some extra options with upscaling the resolution to create some really hardware-intensive texture and AA options.

    That's a slight oversimplification that could potentially place you in an uncomfortable situation when upgrading some time down the line. :p If you don't check the options your motherboard comes with when you build your PC because you know all the parts you have selected are compatible, only to later find out that it doesn't support the amount of memory you'd like to add or doesn't have the appropriate CPU socket, you will end up having to spend a lot more time and money on upgrading in the future because you'll have to replace the motherboard in addition to any other changes you planned (whilst ensuring that everything, both new and old, is compatible and reconnected to the new mobo).

    That said, the mobo listed in the article is decent and more than enough if Skaara wanted to upgrade it even now. It has the LGA 1151 socket (introduced just last year), which is the more recent one Intel uses for their processors and hence you have some more powerful options available, as opposed to (for example) the older LGA 1155 that I'm currently stuck with. It also has four memory modules, so that should be plenty and leaves Skaara with the potential to have as much as 32 gigs of DDR4 RAM later on (if that's what he would want, but right now it would definitely be overkill unless there's some serious 3D modelling and rendering that he plans to do). Only downside I can see is the lack of support for DDR3 RAM, so the only memory he will be able to install is the more expensive DDR4. However, it won't be a problem once DDR4 becomes the standard and drops in price, plus it's not like he will be able to use any DDR3 memory with the DDR4 RAM he will already have installed.

    Indeed, SSDs were all the rage not that long ago (still are to some extent). They are a fair bit faster for stuff like start-up times and browsing folders (can't speak from experience as I've never had one, but there's plenty of evidence out there), however a few months ago I read something about SSDs actually degrading quite fast when left without use, which obviously puts your data at risk. Can't remember how widespread and likely to happen it was, but it scared me away from the SSD. So I tend to stick with HDDs, as they give you more space for less money and are in theory more reliable, but also quite slower. It's just something to think about. :)

    That sucks man. I've had that happen on mine only once or twice, but most times I can turn it off without problems. Still, I recommend just leaving it on at all times when you use the PC and even when you leave it on for a while and it goes to sleep (after all, the forced power save mode is for that), only turning the monitor off completely only when you turn the computer and everything else off as well.
     
  5. Skaara Dreadlocks

    Skaara Dreadlocks
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    First off I just want to say thank you so much for your replies :D

    Thanks, good to have some official confirmation that the planned PC can handle the VR goggles. I actually hadn't thought of that at all, I had just gone ahead and assumed it'd be good enough.
    I would define "mid-range recommended" as the limit where you get most out of your money. You buy something cheaper, it won't last as long compared to how much you spent. Same goes for anything that's more expensive. You do get that extra boost, but in the long run it's an unnecessarily expensive investment. I'm thinking the parts that this PCgamer guide lists are on that perfect pricing/efficiency; not too expensive and unnecessarily powerful, and not too cheap and short-lasting. After all, I do want the computer to last for a good few years when I'm investing so much money into it.

    You don't say.... I looked up the prices in my local store on all of these parts, and calculated my way to over 1100$ for these parts, and that's without the Power Supply, Primary & Secondary Storage, CPU Cooler and Disc Drive. I'll also need a monitor and the VR goggles :shocked: I already have a 600W power supply and a disc drive. My current PC has 8GB DDR3 RAM, the GTX660 and an ASUS motherboard with in-buildt Intel Core i5 2.8GHz, which I bought used from a friend a few years back.


    Cheeki Breeki, very good :D I'm slightly confused about having two hard-discs though; I can have games stored on my secondary 1TB HDD, and play them through the 250GB SDD? So it'll be kind of the same as having a 1,25TB SSD?
    I don't want to spend a ton of money on a 1TB SSD, yet I don't want an HDD to be the "bottleneck" in my new rig.
    Sorry to hear about your monitor though, that's gotta be a real pain in the neck :sad:

    8GB should be enough, if not more than enough. But 16GB RAM is just a teeny tiny tad bit more expensive, so I think it's worth that little extra money so I'm 100% sure I've definitely got enough ram. After all, it's a very small price we're talking about, especially in comparison to the overall price of the whole computer.

    ---

    My local tech-store, where I've been thinking to buy these parts from, had what they called an "hour-sale", selling PC parts on sale for just one hour. As luck would have it, the exact mobo and GPU from the PCgamer guide were on sale, and I bought them. Saved myself some money there. The Intel Core i5 6600 was not on sale, but the 6500 was. Never the less, I decided not to take any chances, and just go for "high-end" with that CPU, because the 6500 has only 3.2GHz whilst the 6600 has 3.5GHz.
    The 6500 was on sale for 175 usd, and the 6600 was 304 usd. Nearly double the price, so I dunno if it was the right call. It was kind of a hasty decision because I had like 15 minutes left. I'd want to ask you guys first, but I just had to purchase before the hour ended :p So what do you think? Was it a bad idea?

    In addition, instead of going for the 117 usd tower that PC Gamer suggested, I got this, which was 328 usd but I got it on 57% sale for 140 usd :D That's a fairly low rise in price, with such an up-grade from the cheaper tower.
     
    #5 Skaara Dreadlocks, Mar 10, 2016
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 10, 2016
  6. Bamul

    Bamul
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    I can understand getting 16 gigs instead of 8 gigs if I was building or buying a PC right now as well. After all, 16 gigs might be just a bit more than what you need for most things at the moment, but like I said there are more and more intensive games that try to make better use of the RAM, so might as well be one step ahead in case we see an overall jump anytime soon.

    With the hard drives it works like this: an SSD, no matter how fast, will not improve your frame rate in a game. It can potentially decrease loading times for you, especially in multiplayer games, but other than that you won't really notice any improvement in gaming. If you want a program to make use of the SSD's increased read and write speed, it will need to be installed on that drive (so you will not be able to store your games on one drive and launch them from the other). What I recommend is - if you're going along with the SSD - to use it to install your operating system as well the most essential programs and those that make use of the drive a lot, as well as a few games that you play often and want to make the most out of (this will make it so that folder browsing speeds for anything located on that drive will be much faster). Everything else, including most games, I'd install on the HDD - especially seeing as how game sizes are getting larger.

    As for your current specs - they're actually still pretty good, but there's enough of a difference between them and the new stuff you're getting to justify the price point (especially considering the large jump between processors). Besides, like you said, you definitely need a better GPU like the GTX 970 if you want to use VR as the GTX 660 just won't cut it.

    There doesn't seem to be that much of a difference between i5 6500 and 6600. The latter is of course more powerful, but I'm not sure if it was worth it considering how much more expensive it was than the 6500. Still, if I had the money I'd probably do the same as you just to make sure I get the better option to go along with the GPU (if your CPU is noticeably weaker than your graphics card, it can drag down its performance). Plus the 6600 has the potential to be even more powerful if you choose to overclock it later on. As for the new case, looks good to me - I looked up the specs and I think it's slightly taller and longer, but just a little bit thinner.

    The only thing I have to point out is please remember to check if everything is compatible, especially when you start replacing parts already selected from a tested build to something else. You don't wanna find yourself in a situation where you've spent loads of money only to not be able to build it all in the end. Obviously, you haven't changed things around much at all yet, but if you do then you should just make doubly sure that everything will work before you buy it. You could use websites like this (click on 'start a system build' at the top) to select your parts and it will check if they're compatible. In fact, I think it even restricts your choices based on previous ones (so if you pick an LGA 1151 CPU then you will only be able do add mobos with the LGA 1151 socket, and so on). Nevertheless, it's best to make sure by asking a techie or to look up similar questions online in addition to that, as an answer from a person takes more factors into consideration than an automated one generated by a system cannot.

    Oh and one final thing, when you're looking at PSUs remember that it's not just about the wattage but also the amperage. In this case, the GTX 970 - even though it is considerably stronger - is actually more power efficient than the GTX 660 as well, so you probably won't have a problem because it actually needs slightly less amps and about the same wattage. Just make sure that your power supply has the correct connectors for your new GPU.
     
  7. Skaara Dreadlocks

    Skaara Dreadlocks
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    Nice, I can put games like Arma3 and GTA V on that, and most other games on the HDD, thanks for the thorough explanation :D

    I'd have to get someone to help me with that, if it ever came to it :embarassed:
    Nice, I think more slim towers look better actually. Let's hope it fits inside my PC-desk, I wouldn't ever dare to put it elsewhere :eek:

    That's the great thing though; because of how my local tech-shop is pretty expensive, they have excellent customer service and will take anything in return, if I've bought a wrong part. Never the less, it's always best to check first and be certain of course, thank you. It's just like when my network-card died, I was just about to buy one that wasn't gonna fit. Luckily I came to my senses in time and double-checked, finding out that I had to buy another specific type because the motherboard is relatively old. And this reminds me that the network card most likely won't fit with my new motherboard... damn it! :lol: :derp:

    -But then I came to think of how I once had an audio-card, but on my current motherboard it is buildt-in. So on the next motherboard, perhaps the network-"card" is buildt-in too? I just looked up the specs of the mobo and saw this:
    Intel Gigabit Ethernet, LANGuard & GameFirst III: Top-speed protected networking.

    Oh, I didn't know that. Good to hear that it'll suffice, but I will double check it to make sure :) I was never good at the electricity-subject, but I have to deal with it at work sometimes, so I know the basics at least... I think :p

    EDIT: I just looked up the link you posted, and added all my parts. It answered with this:
    But CPU coolers aren't that expensive, so I'll see how it goes and buy one eventually; I'm not gonna be using the PC until I've got all the parts anyway. I do have a CPU cooler, but idk if it's too old or slow or if it fits etc.
     
    #7 Skaara Dreadlocks, Mar 10, 2016
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 10, 2016
  8. Bamul

    Bamul
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    If I were you I'd just save myself the hassle and try to find the one listed in the PC Gamer article that you're using as your main point of reference. Cooler Master is a good brand and the exact model is bound to work with your CPU since they've already built and tested a rig with that configuration. Though if your older one will work with the new processor then go ahead with that, it's always a bit more money saved, however I can't help you at all with CPU coolers personally since I have next to zero knowledge about them (I tend to rely on stock ones included with each processor or pre-built PC).
     
  9. NuclearWastE3

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    Good on ya, m8! (I'm Australian now, BTW)
    Nice to hear you were able to get those sweet deals at your tech store just in time :) And Bamul has done a nice job covering the rest of the info about you new computer. Also, let me suggest that, since you live in Norway, you should cut a hole in your room, that leads to the outside, and attach a hose to your CPU so you can naturally cool your computer with that crisp, Norwegian, mountain/glaciaer air (assuming you live near mountains) :p
     
  10. Bamul

    Bamul
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    Best advice posted in this thread so far. :lol:
     
  11. Skaara Dreadlocks

    Skaara Dreadlocks
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    Best advice indeed :laugh:
    Unfortunately, I live down by the coast, but it's still cold enough during winter :D
     
  12. Potarto

    Potarto
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    Oh god, somebody's building a PC and didn't tell me. I'm just gonna dive in here and start addressing the stuff talked about.

    First Post: Intel "K" series processors generally have a tiny clock speed boost and an unlocked multiplier, allowing overclocking directly in the BIOS. If you plan to overclock down the line (and have a decent motherboard that will take it), then it can be worth it. If not, we can easily find a processor that will perform just as well for all intents and purposes for at least $20 less (i.e. the 4790 is around 10% slower, but costs more than $40 less than the 6600k).

    The motherboard looks pretty solid. The memory is a decent deal for DDR4, 8 GB. Do note that 8 GB is starting to be pushed to its limit in a small number of modern AAA games. Thankfully RAM is pretty easy and cheap to upgrade, but do keep in mind that you may want to throw in some more down the line as games become bigger and bigger.

    The Graphics Card is at the high-end sweet spot, and currently the top-selling GPU on the market. It is more than substantial for playing modern games at 1080p, though do note that VR has a significant performance hit due to it effectively rendering every scene twice, meaning that you will most likely have to bump a number of settings down in more visually demanding titles.

    As for Nvidia vs. AMD, the general pattern is that you get more VRAM and performance for your buck with AMD, but Nvidia is generally much faster than AMD at getting game-ready drivers up to snuff, meaning that if you plan to buy games at launch, you might have issues with AMD. To compare the 970 to its AMD competitor in the same price bracket, the R9 390:

    390 has 8 GB of VRAM, while 970 has 4, effective 3.5 due to a cost-saving measure that results in the last .5 running at drastically lower clock speed.

    VRAM is primarily used in the process of running games at higher resolutions and with higher texture settings. If you have enough then having more doesn't improve performance at all, but if you don't have enough, then frequent stuttering and hitching can occur in gameplay. Here is an example of what that stuttering generally looks like. 3.5 GB is definitely plenty for just about anything at 1080p these days, but it's far less future-proof than doubling that.

    The 390 also performs better in a variety of benchmarks. While the 970 can often do a bit better at launch due to better drivers, the 390 will generally close the gap after a bit, and often even pass it by a bit, though they two are still generally quite close (though as you can see in the video, the 390 generally has a larger lead in games where it does pull ahead). Here's a video with a variety of benchmarks comparing the cards. If it seems like a lot happening, just follow the red line for the 390, and the green one for the 970.

    The 970 is also more power efficient (almost half the TDP), meaning that you'll need a less powerful PSU to run it, though you should always be shooting for more than enough anyways, and the 600W PSU should be plenty. This might be an issue if you plan to add a second GPU, however, though you could also upgrade to something like a 750W PSU for not too much more if you wanted to.

    So, up to you. 390 will perform a bit better in a lot of games post-launch support, and has more VRAM, but the 970 will be more consistent, especially right at launch.

    The SSD looks like a fine choice for installing your OS and a few games on. That 2 TB HDD is quite fast for a disc-based HDD, but still doesn't come close to an SSD, and you could easily get away with a slightly slower 2 TB for less than 80 dollars.

    DVD drive is also up to you. Most people I know that get one rarely ever use it, but if you'd like to play it safe, it's not exactly the most expensive part of the build.

    To close, I would like to add that the longer you wait to build your PC, the better parts and prices you'll have access to. I would also definitely wait until Star Citizen comes closer to launch to build an appropriate PC for it, but I can understand why you want to get this out of the way, so just understand that this is a risk you take when you build a PC in advance for a game.

    Oh, and the CPU cooler is a nice one, but the stock cooler is plenty enough for stock clock speeds, and if you're doing any major overclocking then you're gonna want a better cooler anyways. YOu could shave another $30 or so off of that if you wanted to, but if you want a quieter and slightly nicer cooler, it's a good buy.
    I'm gonna go through the other comments here in a separate post to keep things organized, since I have an awful lot to say.
     
    #12 Potarto, Mar 15, 2016
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 15, 2016
  13. Potarto

    Potarto
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    So it looks like you do match the recommended specs for VR, though it's worth knowing that if you shoot for the minimum on anything, you have a good chance of running into subpar performance down the line.

    Nuke does make a good point that you can upgrade to better SSD for a good price, might be worth it; 500 GB is more than enough for a lot of games if you manage space properly, and keep a second HDD for slower but more expansive storage.

    I'm also pretty sure his monitor issues are unique and nothing specific to worry about.

    Wrong. GPU's upgraded from DDR3 to DDR5 years ago; DDR5 memory has significantly higher bandwidth, but more latency, making it better suited for GPU tasks than as system memory. DDR4 is a lower-voltage version of DDR, and actually can perform slightly worse in some modern games at identical speeds compared to DDR3, but often ships with higher clock speeds (such as how the DDR4 in Skaara's build ships at 2400 mhz, whereas my DDR3 is sitting at 1600).

    Git fukt
    [​IMG]

    As for how it affects performance, higher speed memory allows for higher CPU performance, since the CPU spends less time waiting for memory to finish reading/writing. It won't make that big of a difference in games, since the GPU is usually the first thing to be bottlenecked, but it's still worth making sure that your overall performance is up to snuff.

    Yes, the mid-high end components are often at the sweet spot of what you get for your money; generally around $200-250 for a CPU, and $200-350 for a GPU. Durability and life span generally isn't the major issue if you're referring to, but obsolescence is always something that comes down the line.

    Also, network and audio chips are included on just about any modern motherboard. Separate sound cards are only really worth it if you're a major audiophile running special headphones that need extra power through the headphone connector, and any respectable motherboard should come with an Ethernet port. You're fine, unless you want wifi.

    Jokes aside, sub-zero temperatures can ruin PC parts due to condensation.

    That's all I have for now. Sorry for the wall of text, lemme know if you have any more questions.
     
  14. Bamul

    Bamul
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    I got that mixed up. Guess I wasn't thinking straight when I was writing that. I would appreciate the lengthy explanation if I didn't know the difference, but I do and the arrogant way you wrote it makes me feel as though you were trying to "show off" and make me feel stupid rather than actually be helpful. Don't know how to feel about that. I'm too tired and ill to give a fuck right now. :p
     
  15. NuclearWastE3

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    Excellent additional information; especially on comparing the Nvidia versus the ATI GPU. However, I also got that "feeling" that Bamul sensed; at least for a portion in your second post. I could tell you were joking, in way (as shown through your Taylor Swift Air Hump Gif). But yeah.....

    And if you're still ill, Bamul, try some Slavic cold cures from Boris. ;)
     
    #15 NuclearWastE3, Mar 15, 2016
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 15, 2016
  16. Potarto

    Potarto
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    Just giving you shit, dude. Feel better.
     
  17. Bamul

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    Thanks, that reminded me I still have some Krakus vodka in the freezer. Already feeling better. :lol:

    Cheers. :p
     
  18. Skaara Dreadlocks

    Skaara Dreadlocks
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    Thanks for all the info with prices and all, very interesting and handy to know, but as stated earlier, I've already bought all the parts :)
    I considered getting the Intel Core i5 6500 instead of the 6600K because it was much cheaper, but I decided that I don't want to end up with a bottleneck in any way, I'd rather be unnecessarily poorer but still on the safe side, so I did buy the 6600K.

    By Wi-fi, I presume you mean Wireless network? So if I don't get a network-card, I'll have to use a cable? If so, that's out of the question, I must have Wi-fi :p Here's the thing though:

    In my previous PC, the old network-card died. It was in an old type of slot, specifically this:
    https://www.komplett.no/product/617...skort/tp-link-tl-wn851n-11n-wireless-adapter#
    Because of how the Connection-type was so old, I looked around for a while before I eventually bought that one (a similar one with Three antennas, a little more expensive). What I didn't realize, though, was that my motherboard also had slots that a New network-card-type would fit into... I just didn't see them.

    My New PC does have those "modern" slots, but not the old ones, so my relatively New network-card which was decently expensive won't fit into my New PC, so now I have to buy another one again :rant: If I had only seen that I could have bought a modern type for my old motherboard..... :pout:

    Anyway, now I'm wondering should I get this one, which I believe is the equivalent to my previous one, or should I spend the little extra money and get this one? It would look pretty neat in my new PC :rolleyes: But the question is, would it make any difference at all with my internet connection?

    P.S: I've been working on the PC for a while now, and it's almost ready. Sadly, I won't have the time to start it up and install things until Sunday, at the earliest.
     
    #18 Skaara Dreadlocks, Mar 17, 2016
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 17, 2016
  19. Potarto

    Potarto
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    Ah, I hadn't realized you'd already bought the parts.

    I'm hardly an expert on wireless cards, but it seems like you're mainly paying extra for more speed. The main thing is that off of most Wifi signals, you are simply not going to be getting 450 Mbps (or ~56 Megabytes per second!). I'd recommend something cheap with good reviews; USB 2.0 is honestly fast enough for most wifi signals at a max speed of 480 Mbps, and there are plenty of cheaper solutions that are far more cost-efficient.

    Honestly, something like this would likely be plenty substantial. I don't know much about the internet speeds over there, but if you have a router and ISP that get you over 150 Mbps over wifi, then by all means upgrade to something like your first choice. Otherwise, that'd likely be a good choice, or feel free to do some shopping and read reviews around the lower end of things.
     
  20. Skaara Dreadlocks

    Skaara Dreadlocks
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    Tha Baws

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    "Funnily" enough, my internet-Connection is actually so bad that I would be embarassed to say exactly how slow it is. That's kind of why I want a very good one, so I'm certain I get all I can out of the little I have. I Guess it's just wishful thinking that I'm gonna get any more internet speed because of that.

    Thanks for the suggestion about the USB one, but hell no. I've used a USB-Connected wifi-card before as a temporary internet connection when my first internetcard died. I could only play online for half an hour before everything froze, and browsing was real slow. The one you suggested here is probably way better, but I'm not taking any chances going back to USB, it's too unstable in my experience. Either way, I'm moving out, to a place with very fast internet connection in about half a year, so I might as well get the one that's a little more expensive.

    Anyway, a couple hours ago I was finally gonna start the computer after mounting all hardware and wires. It booted up to the BIOS or whatever it's called with no problem, but I had some minor difficulties with installing Windows7 from a USB, so I had to restart the computer. After that, the Graphics card just won't "Connect" to the screen. Nothing shows up, it's as if it's not connected. I find that very odd, as it worked the first time, just a couple minutes before. I've tried several different things afterwards, eventually ruling out the possibility that the Graphics card is broken, or that the wire is broken, or that the screen is broken. It's so weird.

    So I called my Brother who has some experience with this, and he told me to disconnect my HDD and leave the SSD in, and let it run for a while. In case that doesn't fix anything, does anyone have any suggestion as to what could be the problem? :(

    (Sorry for all the random Capital letters and any weird Words, I'm typing this from a Laptop with autocorrect or something)

    ----

    UPDATE: It's finally up and running, officially! :D The problem was fixed by resetting the BIOS.
     
    #20 Skaara Dreadlocks, Mar 20, 2016
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 20, 2016